Tara Minshull Cinematic Worlds Photography

Self taught Photographer and life-long Cinephile creating still worlds that exist in the space between photography and film.

Finding Peace

I finally found my peace. It lurked in the deep corners of the corridors to my heart, buried under anxiousness, nervousness and conformity. Tormented by the expectations of others, I was always trying to move faster towards a goal that would never nourish me.

Until I let go of it all. After some time spent on a beautiful farm, that I still call a home, I found it. Time stood still, my spirit was lifted lighter than ever before and drifted happily in the clouds above me. The glittering life of nature around me settled my spirit into a happy slumber. Warmth enveloped the cloaks of my protective shield until it all melted into love. Finding my peace was finding my heaven. It was a horse like strength that could support my bliss and joyfulness in the clouds.

I keep hold of my sacred peace even now. Nothing shall, or ever will, take it away from me.

Each one has to find his peace from within

—Mahatma Gandhi

Letting Go

This was one of the most difficult compositions I’ve ever created. It was born out of the painful separation of letting go of everything I once had. A decision that became impossible not to make after my life changed along with the universe around me.

The lifestyle I had was destroying my spirit. The routines, the values, the work ethic was all wrong. I needed to find myself, to go on a journey of the heart. To do that, I had to let go of everything.

This composition represents the last look. The courageous goodbye before the velvet, cloaked curtain closes and she begins her journey into the unknown. Nothing is more brave. There is an airy freedom and lightness in her letting go, as dark as the moment is. And the path she leaves behind her is speckled with glimpses of the magic ahead.

I dedicate this image to Nicole Hayes, the subject of this composition. A woman who showed me that to let go is the bravest, most beautiful decision you can do for yourself. Thank you for showing me the way.

Some people believe holding on and hanging in there are signs of great strength. However, there are times when it takes much more strength to know when to let go and then do it

—Ann Landers

Back to my Roots

The inspiration for this ‘cinegraph’ has been stirring within me for some years now. Throughout my life I have considered myself to be purely British. Having been born, raised and educated in England that was very much who I felt I was. That was until I moved to Los Angeles with my mother and brother where we became reunited with our Armenian roots. Since then I have slowly begun to recognize the values, culture, foods, passions and history of what it is to be Armenian. 

The pomegranate is the national symbol of the Armenian people. Used in poetry, art and food it represents the life and nourishment that kept the people alive during the genocide, eating one seed a day during exile. 

I use the pomegranate in my ‘cinegraph’ to tell my story. Re-growing back to my roots that begin to fruit the Armenian symbol, while I collect each one to treasure and represent who I am today.

Back to my Roots

The inspiration for this ‘cinegraph’ has been stirring within me for some years now. Throughout my life I have considered myself to be purely British. Having been born, raised and educated in England that was very much who I felt I was. That was until I moved to Los Angeles with my mother and brother where we became reunited with our Armenian roots. Since then I have slowly begun to recognize the values, culture, foods, passions and history of what it is to be Armenian.

The pomegranate is the national symbol of the Armenian people. Used in poetry, art and food it represents the life and nourishment that kept the people alive during the genocide, eating one seed a day during exile.

I use the pomegranate in my ‘cinegraph’ to tell my story. Re-growing back to my roots that begin to fruit the Armenian symbol, while I collect each one to treasure and represent who I am today.

A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots

—Marcus Garvey

Death by Kino

This ‘Cinegraph’ is self-referential and personal to me. For many years now I have felt rather violated by having my photograph taken. The knowledge that someone had captured my image in a way I have never seen myself before, while being unable to attain it, was unnerving. With each shutter closure I was being turned into a commodity and becoming, somehow, symbolically possessed.

In this composition, I myself am being photographed by friend and photographer Josh Gallo. It was a nerve-racking, soul invasive experience for me. As the all seeing Kino flashed his eye at my body he consumed my every move. This ‘cinegraph’ shows my soul being vacumed into the camera’s lens, leaving my body empty and lifeless. The glow of light is usurped by flying moths, who decay the glamour of being gazed at by the camera.

Regardless of my own persoal difficulties being photographed, it was a priviledge to collaborate with Josh and to develop my composition through someone else’s eyes.

Death by Kino

This ‘Cinegraph’ is self-referential and personal to me. For many years now I have felt rather violated by having my photograph taken. The knowledge that someone had captured my image in a way I have never seen myself before, while being unable to attain it, was unnerving. With each shutter closure I was being turned into a commodity and becoming, somehow, symbolically possessed.

In this composition, I myself am being photographed by friend and photographer Josh Gallo. It was a nerve-racking, soul invasive experience for me. As the all seeing Kino flashed his eye at my body he consumed my every move. This ‘cinegraph’ shows my soul being vacumed into the camera’s lens, leaving my body empty and lifeless. The glow of light is usurped by flying moths, who decay the glamour of being gazed at by the camera.

Regardless of my own persoal difficulties being photographed, it was a priviledge to collaborate with Josh and to develop my composition through someone else’s eyes.

All photographs are memento mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s (or thing’s) mortality, vulnerability, mutability. Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it, all photographs testify to time’s relentless melt.

—Susan Sontag

Looking Down the Rabbit Hole

This composition was inspired by Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland but more specifically, by a personal loss.

The separation of two people can be difficult, and oftentimes out of our control. The loss I refer to is the metaphysical kind. A disconnect. When one loses oneself in the dark. Falls down a rabbit hole, while their loved ones watch from above.

Sometimes the dark seems rather magical, intriguing and spiritual. And oftentimes it can be. The intrigue for us all is constant and challenging. 

This Cinegraph tells the story of the girl who looks hypnotically into the glowing depths of the Rabbit Hole, unsure whether or not to fall in…what would you do?

Looking Down the Rabbit Hole

This composition was inspired by Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland but more specifically, by a personal loss.

The separation of two people can be difficult, and oftentimes out of our control. The loss I refer to is the metaphysical kind. A disconnect. When one loses oneself in the dark. Falls down a rabbit hole, while their loved ones watch from above.

Sometimes the dark seems rather magical, intriguing and spiritual. And oftentimes it can be. The intrigue for us all is constant and challenging.

This Cinegraph tells the story of the girl who looks hypnotically into the glowing depths of the Rabbit Hole, unsure whether or not to fall in…what would you do?

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well

—Lewis Carroll